BLACK 🌍 HISTORY SPOTLIGHT : BOBBY HUTTON

By: Leon Kwasi Kuntuo-Asare

Bobby Hutton (Robert James Hutton) was born on April 21, 1950, in Jefferson County, Arkansas. He was the son of John D. Hutton and Dolly Mae Mitchner-Hutton. At the age of three, Bobby and his family moved to Oakland, California after his family was visited by a group of white supremacists, threatening to harm his family.

As an adolescent, Hutton would meet Huey Newton and Bobby Seale, the two founders of the Black Panther Party in North Oakland, at the government funded Neighborhood Anti-Poverty Center, a program dedicated to the employment of local youths for service projects.

In 1966, at the age of 16, Hutton would become the first recruited member and also the first treasurer of the Black Panther Party.

In May of 1967, Hutton with thirty Black Panther Party members traveled to Sacramento, California to protest the Mulford Act at the state Capital , a bill that would make it illegal to carry loaded firearms while in public, when Hutton and others walked into the state assembly, he and four other panthers were arrested.

On April 6, 1968, during a failed ambush attempt on Oakland police, which was led by Elridge Cleaver, and was supposed to be blacklash for the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. , who was killed 2 days early, Hutton was killled during the shootout with the cops. Cleaver claimed that OPD shot Hutton more than a dozen times after he had already surrendered . Cleaver would later say ” What they did was first degree murder.”

Hutton’s funeral was held on April 12, at Ephesians Church of God in Berkeley, several famous people attended, including activist and author James Baldwin and actor Marlon Brando. At the time of his death, Bobby Hutton was only 17 years old.

Short artistic video on the legacy of Bobby Hutton

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION USE LINK BELOW : 
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobby_Hutton

THE GEORGIA COP WHO MADE-UP STORY ABOUT BEING SHOT BY A BLACK MAN, FACES FOUR FELONY CHARGES 

By: Leon Kwasi Kuntuo-Asare

A police officer in Jackson, Georgia who made-up a story about being shot by a black man faces four felony charges, including giving false statements to police, because on September 13, police officer Sherry Hall claimed that while on patrol around 12am, according to her report she saw a” 6ft tall, 230 lbs black man wearing a green shirt and black jogging pants”, loitering on the side of the street.

She claimed that “after she exited the vehicle, he became very argumentative” which led to him pulling out a gun and shooting her in the lower part of her vest.

As the Georgia Bureau of Investigation started to investigate officer Hall’s case, her story immediately began to unravel, it soon became obviously to them that officer Hall fabricated the entire story, no doubt placing the well-being of many black men in that area, in danger of cops seeking retribution for a fellow officer, who they believed was wounded in the line of duty. According to the Root.com GBI Special Agent in Charge Joe Wooten said: ” the investigation revealed that there is, and never was , a suspect at large in Jackson, Georgia. ”

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION USE LINK :

http://www.theroot.com/articles/news/2016/09/sherry-hall-ga-cop-black-man/

BLACK🌍HISTORY SPOTLIGHT : H. RAP BROWN

By: Leon Kwasi Kuntuo-Asare

H. Rap Brown (Hubert Gerold Brown), the former civil rights activist and chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee ( SNCC ), was born on October 4, 1943 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

In 1967, he was arrested in Cambridge, Maryland, and charged with inciting a riot, after giving a powerful and fiery speech. Brown would make the FBI’s ten most wanted list, after failing to appear in court for charges of inciting a riot and bringing a gun across state lines, Brown would eventually go to trial in Bel Air, Maryland.

On March 9, 1970, William Payne and Ralph Featherstone two officials in the SNCC organization were blown up in their car en route to the courthouse in Bel Air, Maryland, where Brown was to be put on Trial. The two main theories are first that the two men were assassinated on their way to the courthouse and the other is the two associates of Brown intended to set off the bomb at the courthouse to disrupt the trial.

Brown would disappear and be on the run for approximately a year and a half, which would come to an end after he allegedly attempted a robbery at a bar, which resulted with a shootout with New York City police officers in 1971.Brown would spend the next five years of his life from 1971-1976, at Attica Prison, after he was convicted of robbery. While incarcerated Brown converted to Islam and change his name to Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin. After he was released from prison, he would open a grocery store and become a community activist and Muslim spiritual leader in the Atlanta, Georgia area.

It is theorized that Brown now Al-Amin life took a turn for the worst when he allegedly became associated with the Dar Ul-Islam movement.

On March 16, 2000, in Fulton County, Georgia, when two Sheriffs came to deliver an arrest warrant for failure to appear in court for a speeding citation, somehow he and the sheriffs engaged in a shootout, one of the two sheriff deputies died and the deputy who survived identified Al-Amin as the shooter.

Almost exactly two years to the day of the shootout, on March 9, 2002, he was convicted of 13 criminal charges and sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

Short speech by H. Rap Brown

For additional information use link below : https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._Rap_Brown

BLACK HISTORY 🌍 SPOTLIGHT : ELLA BAKER

By: Leon Kwasi Kuntuo-Asare

Ella Josephine Baker was born on December 13, 1903 in Norfolk, Virginia. She was raised with her parents Georgiana and Blake Baker. At the age of 7, her family moved to her grandmother’s hometown of Littleton, North Carolina, a Small rural town. There she would hear great historic tales of courageous slave revolts, including the story of her maternal grandmother, Josephine Elizabeth “Bet” Ross, who was whipped by her master for refusing to marry a man, her master had chosen for her.

Baker would attend Shaw University in Raleigh, North Carolina, where she would graduate as class valedictorian in 1927, during her college days, she also built a reputation for standing up against school policies that she believed to be unjust. After college she moved to New York City.

In 1931, Baker would join the young Negroes Cooperative League (YNCL) which was a group dedicated to black economic empowerment, she would soon raise to the rank of national director of the organization.

During the 1930’s Baker worked with the Worker’s Education Project of the Works Progress Administration , there taught classes in labor history, African history and consumer education. She would also immerse herself into the political atmosphere of the time, by protesting Italy’s invasion of Ethiopia and supporting the campaign to free the Scottsboro defendants in Alabama, a group of black youths, she believed were falsely accused of raping two white women. At around this time, Baker began to advocate for nationwide, local activism as a means of achieving political change.

Baker believed grassroots activism did not need charismatic leaders with a messiah complex, instead she believed and taught that the struggle should be fought by we the people in the streets, on a grassroots level.

In late 1940, Baker began working for the National Association for the Advancement of colored people (NAACP), where she first worked as a secretary, then soon began recruiting new members locally, raising money and organizing local events. She rose fast in the organization, and in 1945 was named Director of Branches.

In 1946 Baker returned to New York, to take care of her niece, which forced her to leave her leadership role in the NAACP. She would still continue to volunteer for the organization on a local level. She would soon join the New York chapter of the NAACP, where she worked hard to end segregation in public schools and police brutality against black people. In 1952 she would become president of the New York chapter.

Baker would resign from the organization in 1953 to run for New York City, city council as a member of the Liberal Party, she was unsuccessful in her bid for city office.

In 1957 Baker traved to Atlanta, Georgia to take part in a conference that was supposed to build on the success of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, in February of that same year, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was formed.

The organization’s aim was to unite black churches and their leaders, who fought against systematic white supremacy in the south, as they used nonviolent protests to fight against systematic white supremacy oppression. Baker was the organization’s first staff member, she soon began to organize voter registration, assist local activists with their local grievances, helping local civil rights activists in states like Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi.

In 1960, Baker insisted the SCLC invite southern student protestors, who were having desegregation
sit-ins to Shaw University, for a youth civil rights conference, to discuss their struggles and go over possible solutions with the young activsts in attendance. At this meeting the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) was created. SNCC would become the most active civil rights organization in the Delta region of the United States. After the conference, Baker would resign from the SCLC and would become an advisor to the SNCC activsts.

In 1964 Baker would help organize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party ( MFDP) which was to be an alternative to the racist and all-white Mississippi party.

From 1962-1967 Baker worked as staff for the Southern Conference Education Fund (SCEF) , which was an interracial organization, that fought for social justice issues, human rights and fought against segregation.

In 1972 Baker Traveled the nation to give her support in the “Free Angela” campaign, the objective was to get justice for civil rights activist Angela Davis, whose supporters believed was targeted unlawfully by law enforcement for her political and activism activities.

Towards the end of her life, she still continued to support many causes including the Puerto Rican Independence Movement, she supported many women’s groups and spoke out against the brutally racist South African apartheid regime.

In 1986, on her 83rd birthday she died.

Here our some of her most famous  quotes:

Cornel West thoughts on the great civil rights activist Ella Baker.

For additional information use link below :

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ella_Baker