Skip to content

Tag: feminism

african-american 0

BLACK WOMAN AWARDED $1 MILLION DOLLARS IN RACIAL AND GENDER DISCRIMINATION CASE AGAINST THE STATE OF ARIZONA

By: Leon Kwasi Kuntuo-Asare

Talonya Adams, a Black woman who was an Arizona Senate staffer was awarded one million dollars in damages by a federal judge who sided with her in her case against the state of Arizona.

According to the suit, Adams was fired as a policy adviser to the Senate’s Democratic caucus in 2015, when she started to question her heavy workload and relatively low salary.

Adams, represented herself in the case, and was able to prove that she was paid a lot less than her White Male co-workers, who performed the same job, she also mentioned the differences in the amount of leave she was allowed to take versus the amount of leave her White male counterparts were allowed to take.

For additional information use the link below:

https://atlantablackstar.com/2019/07/16/former-arizona-senate-staffer-represents-herself-in-court-scores-1m-award-in-racial-and-gender-discrimination-case/

african diaspora 0

FINALLY GIVEN THEIR RIGHTFUL RESPECT

By: Leon Kwasi Kuntuo-Asare

During War War 2, the Women’s Army Corps 6888 Central Postal Directory Battalion made military history when over 800 Black women had the unenviable task of sorting through millions of letters and packages for millions of American soldiers fighting against the Nazis.

According to the U.S. Army Center of Military History: the women tackled the parcels in England in February 1945. They later sailed to France where they continued sorting through the piles of mail.

This past Memorial Day, the unit was finally given it’s long overdue respect, when it and its surviving members were honored in a Memorial Day parade in Washington, D.C., this past Monday.

For additional information use the link below:

https://atlantablackstar.com/2019/05/29/all-black-womens-army-battalion-receives-long-overdue-recognition-more-than-seven-decades-after-service/

african diaspora 6

NOT YOUR SISTERS IN THE STRUGGLE: WHITE WOMEN WERE HUGE FIGURES IN THE ENSLAVEMENT OF BLACK MEN AND WOMEN

By: Leon Kwasi Kuntuo-Asare

A study by a professor at the University of California-Berkeley revealed that White women were not the docile bystanders as my people may of thought, when it came to the business of enslaving Black people.

An associate professor of history at the University named Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers, discovered through her census data research that from the years 1850-1860, White women in the south were about 40% of the slave owners.

According to the BlackStar:

In her book, ” They Were Her Property: White Women as Slave owners in the American South” which is based on her findings as a professor, Jones-Rogers explained that White women’s involvement in slavery comes from family, as their slave-owning parents ” typically have their daughters more enslaved people than land”.

” what this means is that their very identities as southern women are tied to the actual or possible ownership of other people “, she said according to history.com

She would later go on to explain that the ownership of enslaved people of African descent served as White women’s primary source of wealth, and reportedly the larger amount of slaves a White woman owned made her more desirable for marriage by eligible White Male bachelors.

For additional information use the link below:

https://atlantablackstar.com/2019/05/25/research-by-black-female-professor-reveals-startling-truth-that-white-women-made-up-40-of-slaveowners/

african diaspora 4

BLACK HISTORY SPOTLIGHT : HARRIET TUBMAN! ( AFRICAN-AMERICAN MOSES)

image

BY:LEON KWASI KUNTUO-ASARE

Harriet Tubman was born Araminta “Minty” Ross , sometime around 1822 (being a slave, the exact year of her birth is unknown ), in Dorchester County, Maryland, to parents Harriet “Rit” Green and Ben Ross, later in life, Tubman would take her mother’s name of Harriet.

As a young girl in Maryland, Tubman was beaten on countless occasions by her masters. On one occasion she was hit in the head with a heavy metal weight. The result would be an injury that would cause her to have epileptic seizures and headaches for the rest of her life. She even began to have visions, Tubman being a devout Christian believed those visions to be signs from God.

Around the year 1844, Harriet still a slave would marry a freeman named John Tubman. In Maryland at the time, marriages between enslaved people and free blacks were not uncommon.

On September 17, 1849, Tubman would escape from slavery with her two brothers Ben and Henry, but Tubman would be forced to return when her brothers changed their minds about running away. But Tubman would not stay with her masters for long, she would escape again, this time without her brothers, she used the help of the Underground Railroad, which was a network that consisted of enslaved blacks, freemen , Quakers and white abolitionists, all with the common goal of setting enslaved blacks free.

Once free and settled in Philadelphia, Tubman would go back in the slave states, putting both her freedom and life at risk, to save not only family members , but many other blacks still held in bondage. It is estimated that Tubman made 19 trips using the Underground Railroad to save approximately 300 black slaves.

During the civil war, Tubman would work for the union army , she helped nurse wounded soldiers back to health and even performed duties as a armed scout and spy.

After the war was over and black people were free, at least on paper, Tubman would begin to fight for women’s rights with the suffragist movement.

Sadly on March 20, 1913, in Auburn, New York, at the age of 91, Harriet Tubman would die of pneumonia. Tubman would be buried at Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn. She was given semi-military honors for her service during the American civil war.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WATCH THIS SHORT VIDEO :

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION USE SOURCE LINKS BELOW :

http://www.harriet-tubman.org/facts-kids/

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Tubman